Last edited by Banris
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Tactile reaction time compared in deaf and normal. found in the catalog.

Tactile reaction time compared in deaf and normal.

Nancy Zingler Cowgill

Tactile reaction time compared in deaf and normal.

by Nancy Zingler Cowgill

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  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Microform Publications, Colleg of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, University of Oregon in Eugene .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.Ed.) Colorado State University, 1978.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 microfiche ([55 fr.]) :
Number of Pages55
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17332796M

Teaching Strategies for Tactile Learners & Tactile Learning Do you have a tactile learner on your hands? (PUN intended!) ;-) Tactile learning is fun. The key for teaching a tactile learner is to add some type of hands-on activity to each lesson you teach. If your child is a tactile. Reaction time is a measure of how quickly an organism can respond to a particular stimulus. Reaction time has been widely studied, as its practical implications may be of great consequence, e.g. a slower than normal reaction time while driving can have grave results. Many factors have.

Purpose: Caregivers may show greater use of nonauditory signals in interactions with children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH). This study explored the frequency of maternal touch and the temporal alignment of touch with speech in the input to children who are DHH and age-matched peers with normal hearing. Method: We gathered audio and video recordings of mother-child free-play : Rana Abu-Zhaya, Maria V. Kondaurova, Derek Houston, Derek Houston, Amanda Seidl. Books at Amazon. The Books homepage helps you explore Earth's Biggest Bookstore without ever leaving the comfort of your couch. Here you'll find current best sellers in books, new releases in books, deals in books, Kindle eBooks, Audible audiobooks, and so much more.

If those two people were pro-tactile, then the Deaf-Blind person would be able to leave their hand on the hand of the sighted person while they did whatever they needed to do, and the Deaf-Blind person would know what was going on the whole time. Pro-tactile is inclusive—it allows us to be involved in what is going on when it is going on. Children who have Tactile Overresponsivity (tactile defensiveness) are sensitive to touch sensations and can be easily overwhelmed by, and fearful of, ordinary daily experiences and activities. Sensory Overresponsivity (sensory defensiveness) can prevent a child from play and interactions critical to learning and social interactions.


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Tactile reaction time compared in deaf and normal by Nancy Zingler Cowgill Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Tactile reaction time compared in deaf and normal. [Nancy Zingler Cowgill]. to improve the reaction time of operators in an unmanned aerial vehicle ground control station simulation [5].

The use of in-car tactile navigation display could also result in better driver performance and reduce their workload [16]. In this paper, we investigated finger response time to the visual.

Results. Mean reaction time values pooled across observers are displayed in Figure 1 (a-c, corresponding to visual, auditory and tactile reaction time respectively). Repeated-measures ANOVA on unimodal reaction time values (unfilled bars) found an expected and highly-significant effect of sensory modality (F 2, 8 =p Cited by: Tactile reaction time compared in deaf and normal Nancy Zingler Cowgill Fractionated reaction time and movement time in response to a visual s Lannie G.

Tucker2 books Robert M. Hautala, 2 books Rogers Elliott, 1 book Ethel Letitia Cornell, 1 book Theodore Koester, 1 book David Eliot Sherwood, 1 book Carl Hoffman, 1 book Hall.

Open Library is an initiative of the Internet Archive, a (c)(3) non-profit, building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital projects include the Wayback Machine, and   “Between visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli, which is possible of producing the fastest response?” The answer depends entirely on context and what is meant by response.

For example, touching a hot pan usually results in immediate retraction of. Purpose Caregivers may show greater use of nonauditory signals in interactions with children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH). This study explored the frequency of maternal touch and the temporal alignment of touch with speech in the input to children who Author: Rana Abu-Zhaya, Maria V.

Kondaurova, Derek Houston, Derek Houston, Amanda Seidl. Touch+ is a portable tactile audio device that translates audio frequencies into physical vibrations. The device allows deaf people to experience music, while offering everyone the chance to. Driver Reaction Time to Tactile and Auditory Rear-End Collision Warnings While Talking on a Cell Phone Rayka Mohebbi and Rob Gray, Arizona State University, Mesa, Arizona, and Hong Z.

Tan, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana Objective: This study examined the effectiveness of rear-end collision warnings pre- sented in different sensory modalities while drivers were engaged in cell phone.

What is tactile sensitivity. Tactile sensitivity or hypersensitivity is an unusual or increased sensitivity to touch that makes the person feel peculiar, noxious, or even in pain. It is also called tactile defensiveness or tactile over-sensitivity. Like other sensory processing issues, tactile sensitivity can run from mild to severe.

Remember, you can play with more than just your hands. Get the feet in on the action too or let kids paint their whole bodies before bath time. Introduce toys with vibration such as a Squiggle Wiggle Writer, a vibrating pillow, or a vibrating stuffed animal.

Make a touch and feel book with a different page for each texture. Visual perceptual skills of deaf and normal hearing adults were measured using the Eriksen flanker task. Participants were seated in front of a computer screen while a series of target letters.

Young (n = 10, ± yrs) and older adults (n = 13, ± yrs) performed simple reaction time tasks by responding to vibrotactile stimuli using a thumb trigger while frequency. Space-time–(frequency-) windows that revealed a cluster of statistically significant differences were then selected and subsamples of reaction time sorted data (binned according to reaction times) were computed and correlated to the mean reaction times (in order to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio when compared to single trial data, see Cited by: 1.

J Exp Child Psychol. Feb;11(1) Tactile identification of letters: a comparison of deaf and hearing childrens' performances. Schiff W, Dytell by: 4. Tactile Learning is learning through what you feel, exploring what things feel like, discovering by being in contact with someone, feeling things together, learning to reach out.

A number of authors have covered this topic in depth. My reaction to "Deaf People Hearing For The first Time" 1) Subscribe for more Videos: 2)Previous Video: It is time for the government to increase funds on research that will study innovative approaches in dealing with deafness.

(“Personal reaction to the book Deaf Like Me by Thomas S. Spradley Essay”, n.d.) they then began their journey in search of how they Author: Zhartmann. Speech Communication for the Deaf: Visual, Tactile, and Cochlear-Implanta AbstractA review is given of current research and development on electronic devices to aid speech communication for the deaf.

I r Visual and tactile displays are compared with stimulation of hear- ing via electrodes implanted in the cochlea. Specific comparative. Deaf students were first placed in hearing schools or mainstream programs, where they had a hard time and often fell behind their peers, due to classroom communication issues.

Then, after that didn't work, they finally got put in a day or residential school for the deaf, even though they're behind grade level already and may lack basic language.

We provided tactile cues to a student who was deaf, blind, and mentally retarded to guide her performance on a variety of packaging tasks. The student had previously received extensive training on multiple packaging and sequencing tasks through her vocational education by:   A New Reason for Why the Deaf May Have Trouble Reading Ap Easter Faafiti uses sign language to communicate with a teammate during practice by the women's basketball team at Author: VOA Learning English.

This paper discusses issues related to communication, independence, and isolation for an understudied group of deaf people who also have visual impairments. The discussion is based on the experiences of 28 deafblind people in 6 different countries, obtained from interviews that were carried out as part of a larger research project on travel by: